Larissa Bailey

Last name: 
Bailey

As a quantitative ecologist, my research often applies to a wide variety of taxa, and generally focuses on ways of measuring and monitoring biological systems to increase our scientific understanding and improve management decisions. My research involves developing and implementing methods to estimate common state variables used to explore changes in animal communities; namely, population size and species distribution and the vital rates responsible for changes in these state variables. I am particularly interested in factors influencing amphibian and reptile systems, including disease, invasive species and habitat change (loss or fragmentation of aquatic and terrestrial habitats). In addition to basic and applied scientific questions, I also dabble in integrating science into conservation decision making (i.e., decision theory).

Title/Role: 
Associate Professor
Research Interests (Specific): 
My research involves developing and implementing methods to estimate common state variables used to explore changes in animal communities; namely, population size and species distribution and the vital rates responsible for changes in these state variables.
Research Projects: 
Project Title: 
Southern Rocky Mountain Boreal Toads
Project Location: 
United States
Project Location Details: 
Southern Rocky Mountains, including southern Wyoming, mountainous regions of Colorado, and northern New Mexico
Study Species: 
Boreal Toad (Anaxyrus boreas boreas)
Project Description: 
This is a collection of projects aimed at understanding factors influencing population and distributional dynamics of the state-endangered, and federally petitioned, Boreal Toad (Anaxyrus [Bufo] boreas boreas). Projects include: (1) Investigating factors influencing Boreal Toad and disease dynamics (2) Assessing the impact of introduced, endangered cutthroat trout on boreal toad breeding success and recruitment (3) Estimating survival of reintroduced tadpoles and evaluating short-term success of reintroduction efforts (4) Using a structured decision making approach to revise recovery objectives and evaluate potential management actions for endangered amphibians
Project Title: 
Ecology and Conservation of Terrestrial Reptiles in the Great Plains: Monitoring Taxa Vulnerable to a Changing Landscape
Project Location: 
United States
Project Location Details: 
The U.S. Great Plains
Study Species: 
Reptiles
Project Description: 
Approximately 60% of the native terrestrial reptile species found in the Great are listed as state endangered, threatened, or in need of conservation; however, basic information on species distribution is often lacking. Future conservation of native reptiles will depend largely on our understanding of environmental and biological factors that most influence distributions and persistence of native reptiles and our ability to effectively assess trends in their populations over time. Danny Martin, a PhD student at CSU, is assessing factors influencing historic and contemporary reptile distributions, and evaluating various survey methods to develop a comprehensive, volunteer-based monitoring program for these species.