Lise Aubry

Last name: 
Aubry

I am originally from Southern France and received BS and MSc degrees from the Universite Paul Sabatier in Toulouse. I conducted my dissertation work at the Max Plank Institute for demographic research in Germany, where I studied life history trade-offs and senescence in vertebrates. I then moved to Utah State University to pursue postdoctoral research with a focus on wildlife management and human-wildlife conflicts. I was appointed Assistant Professor in 2015 at Utah State University and expanded my research program to include climate change impacts on wildlife. I moved to Colorado State University in 2017 and look forward to establishing my research program in Colorado, with some new projects outlined below.

Title/Role: 
Assistant Professor
Phone: 
435-770-6670
Research Interests (Specific): 
I am a population ecologist interested in how wildlife responds to anthropogenic change. The three primary themes of our research include: 1) quantifying the impacts of anthropogenic factors on the demography and micro-evolution of wild populations; 2) Studying the demographic and physiological processes that mediate variation in individual responses to environmental change and how those scale up to affect populations and communities; 3) understanding and predicting how wild populations respond to management actions and conservation practices.
Research Projects: 
Project Title: 
Climate Change Resilience Across Hibernator Life Histories
Project Location: 
United States
Project Location Coordinates: 
40.5705° N, 105.5913° W
Project Location Details: 
CSU Mountain Campus Area
Study Species: 
Least chipmunk, Golden mantled ground squirrel, Wyoming ground squirrel, yellow-bellied marmot
Project Citations: 

Falvo C., Koons D.N., and L.M. Aubry. Climate change impacts on hibernator phenology and survival. In preparation.

Falvo C., French S.S., Webb A., and L.M. Aubry. The cost of immunity in the wild: elevation shapes distinct life history trade-offs in a sub-alpine hibernator. Oecologia, Under review.

Project Description: 
Measuring, Understanding and Predicting wild population response to environmental change is a pressing matter. Hibernators are especially vulnerable to even small changes in temperature, making them sentinels of climate change. Our overarching goal is to explore the consequences of climate variability on a community of hibernating species that range in their life histories and in their local adaptations to alpine environments. Specifically, we proposed to quantify life history trade-offs along an elevation gradient, and along a slow-fast continuum of hibernator life histories.
Project Title: 
Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Human-Black Bear Conflicts
Project Location: 
United States
Project Location Coordinates: 
40.0583° N, 74.4057° W
Project Location Details: 
North-Western New Jersey
Study Species: 
American Black bear
Project Citations: 

Raithel J.D, Reynolds-Hogland M., Koons D.N., Carr P. and L.M. Aubry (2016). Recreational harvest and incident-response protocols reduce human-carnivore conflicts in an anthropogenic landscape. Journal of Applied Ecology. doi:10.1111/1365-2664.12830.

Raithel J.D., Reynolds-Hogland M., Carr P., and L.M. Aubry. Why Does the Regulated Harvest of Black Bears Affect the Rate of Human-Bear Conflicts in New Jersey? Case Study in the Environment, 1

Project Description: 
Using long-term information on spatially-explicit complaints, capture-mark-recapture, and habitat use in black bears, we hope to identify the causes and consequences of human-bear conflicts along an anthropogenic gradient. We will quantify the relative contributions of food subsidies, urbanization, and management regulations in shaping the dynamic interactions that exist between humans and black bears in the state of New Jersey, which carries the highest coupled densities of black bear and humans in the continental US.
Project Title: 
Integrated Conservation of the Colorado Checkered Whiptail
Project Location: 
United States
Project Location Coordinates: 
38.7421° N, 104.7921° W
Project Location Details: 
Fort Carson and Pinion Canyon Maneuvering Site, Department of Defense Lands
Study Species: 
Colorado checkered whiptail
Project Description: 
The Colorado checkered whiptail (COCW) has greatly declined throughout most of its range as a result of urbanization and conversion of habitat to agricultural uses. Very little is known about the physiology and demography of COCW that still persist today. Given the uncertainty behind COCW population status, distribution, and the impacts of military readiness activities on their demography and stress levels, this project and its results will provide the Fort Carson Conservation Branch with an understand of how abundant COCW are within the different sub-populations, how they are distributed across the landscape, how military activity may impact individuals and populations, and the influence of such activities on COCW physiological stress and fitness. Most importantly, the proposed study will lay the foundation for the monitoring of COCW in future years and guide Fort Carson’s management of this species.