Researchers by Continent

Researchers from across the CSU community working on issues of biodiversity. Fill out this form to join the list!

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Sarah Reed

Sarah Reed is an Associate Conservation Scientist with the North America Program of the Wildlife Conservation Society and an Affiliate Faculty member in the Department of Fish, Wildlife & Conservation Biology at Colorado State University. Sarah’s research investigates how human development patterns and land use practices affect wildlife and biodiversity. She combines landscape-level field experiments with spatial modeling and policy analysis to examine species' responses to residential development, recreation, motor vehicle noise, and other human activities.

Meagan Schipanski

Our research group focuses on how shifting spatial and temporal plant diversity within agroecosystems influences multiple ecosystem functions. We primarily focus on nutrient cycling and organic matter dynamics within cropping systems from rhizosphere to global scales using on-farm, experiment station, greenhouse, and modeling experiments.
 

Andrew Seidl

Andrew Seidl has been Professor & Public Policy Specialist in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics at Colorado State University since 1997. Seidl works in communities that feature unique natural wealth to identify strategies for local people to use to improve management decisions, capture economic benefits and encourage environmental stewardship.

Arathi Seshadri

Trained in evolutionary ecology and behavioral ecology, I am interested in plant-pollinator interactions, honeybee behavior and pollinator conservation in agroecosystems.

Colorado Native Bees Field Guide

 

Kate Shoenecker

Kate Schoenecker has conducted research on ungulate ecology for 19 years for the U.S. Geological Survey and leads the Ungulate Ecology Project. She has a collaborative research program and an Affiliate Faculty position in Ecosystem Science and Sustainability at Colorado State University.

Melinda Smith

My research focuses on understanding the consequences of human-caused global changes, especially the impacts of climatic changes, biological invasions, eutrophication (e.g., increased N deposition), and altered disturbance regimes for biodiversity and ecosystem structure and function.

Craig Starger

Craig Starger is a conservation biologist who works to advance science for biodiversity conservation and sustainable development. Craig has conducted extensive research on coral reef conservation biology, and has spent recent years implementing environmental policy and international development with the US government. His biology research focused on questions related to corals’ adaptive response to climate change, coral recovery, and coral population connectivity, mostly in Asia.

Jane Stewart

I am an Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology in the Department of Agricultural Bioagricultural Sciences and Pest Management at Colorado State University. I received her Master’s Degree in forestry from the University of Vermont and her PhD in plant pathology from Washington State University. I've also held postdoctoral positions at the USDA ARS Horticultural Research Lab in Corvallis, OR, and the Dept. of Plant Pathology at the University of Georgia.

Thomas Stohlgren

Tom Stohlgren, Ph.D., is a Senior Research Scientist at the Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory, where he has held an Affiliate Faculty position since 1991. Tom is recognized as one of the top ten most productive scientists in the world in the field of biological invasions. He has published over 200 scientific papers and a textbook on methods of assessing plant diversity. He received a Bachelor's degree in Forestry from the University of California, Berkeley; Master's degree in Biology from California State University, Fresno; and, Ph.D. in Ecology from the University of California, Davis.

Diana H. Wall

A soil ecologist and environmental scientist, Diana Wall is actively engaged in research exploring how life in soil (microbial and invertebrate diversity) contributes to healthy, fertile and productive soils and thus to society, and the consequences of human activities on soil globally. Her research on soil biota, particularly soil nematodes, extends from agroecosystems to arid ecosystems. Diana has spent more than 25 seasons in the Antarctic Dry Valleys examining how global changes impact soil biodiversity, ecosystem processes and ecosystem services.

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