Researchers by Continent

Researchers from across the CSU community working on issues of biodiversity. Fill out this form to join the list!

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Sarah Reed

Sarah Reed is an Associate Conservation Scientist with the North America Program of the Wildlife Conservation Society and an Affiliate Faculty member in the Department of Fish, Wildlife & Conservation Biology at Colorado State University. Sarah’s research investigates how human development patterns and land use practices affect wildlife and biodiversity. She combines landscape-level field experiments with spatial modeling and policy analysis to examine species' responses to residential development, recreation, motor vehicle noise, and other human activities.

Kristen Ruegg

Kristen Ruegg is an Assistant Professor at Colorado State University and an Adjunct Professor at the Institute for the Environment and Sustainability at the University of California, Los Angeles. She has been working to develop innovative genetic-based tools to conserve migratory birds for over 15 years and is the co-founder and co-director of the Bird Genoscape Project.

Meagan Schipanski

Our research group focuses on how shifting spatial and temporal plant diversity within agroecosystems influences multiple ecosystem functions. We primarily focus on nutrient cycling and organic matter dynamics within cropping systems from rhizosphere to global scales using on-farm, experiment station, greenhouse, and modeling experiments.
 

Courtney A. Schultz

I am a professor of natural resource policy and governance. I investigate issues at the science-policy interface to understand how governance systems are evolving in light of rapid environmental change. My research has investigated policy and policy implementation around biodiversity conservation, climate change adaptation, and forest restoration. I also direct the Public Lands Policy Group (PLPG), a research group focused on US public lands policy and governance.

Andrew Seidl

Andy’s work focuses on natural resource-based economic development. He employs economic approaches to help decision makers identify, quantify and capture the wealth of nature. Nature-based economic development solutions improve the efficiency of resource management and benefit human well-being by identifying hidden costs as well as unexplored opportunities.

Arathi Seshadri

Trained in evolutionary ecology and behavioral ecology, I am interested in plant-pollinator interactions, honeybee behavior and pollinator conservation in agroecosystems.

Colorado Native Bees Field Guide

 

Kenneth Shockley

Kenneth Shockley is Associate Professor and Holmes Rolston III Chair in Environmental Ethics and Philosophy. Currently, he is researching the intersection of environmental ethics, climate ethics, and sustainable development. For the past several years he has served as an observer at UNFCCC meetings. Before joining CSU in the fall of 2016, Shockley taught for 13 years at the University at Buffalo, where he was inaugural academic director of the undergraduate Sustainability Academy.

Kate Shoenecker

Kate Schoenecker has conducted research on ungulate ecology for 19 years for the U.S. Geological Survey and leads the Ungulate Ecology Project. She has a collaborative research program and an Affiliate Faculty position in Ecosystem Science and Sustainability at Colorado State University.

Daniel Sloan

I am an evolutionary biologist, and our research program generally focuses on how processes at the level of molecular genetics can drive evolutionary diversification. Most of our work is with flowering plants, but we also investigate organisms ranging from bacteria to humans to address our biological questions.

Melinda Smith

My research focuses on understanding the consequences of human-caused global changes, especially the impacts of climatic changes, biological invasions, eutrophication (e.g., increased N deposition), and altered disturbance regimes for biodiversity and ecosystem structure and function.

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